Republican Politician Loses Government Disability Pay Demand

Coronado’s Twitter page

On her Twitter feed, Alexandria Coronado—a fan of Tea Party politics, frugal government and Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas)—appropriately lists herself as a “candidate, patriot, mom, educator and advocate.”

Coronado made history as the first Hispanic woman elected to the Anaheim Union High School Board of Trustees 21 years ago and later served on the Orange County Board of Education, where she touted several pro-parental accomplishments against education bureaucrats.

She has also run and lost numerous campaigns, the latest one to state Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva, a Fullerton Democrat, in November.

Now, Coronado can now add another non-achievement to the list: failed contender for monthly government disability checks.

U.S. District Court Judge James V. Selna, a lifetime appointee of President George W. Bush, has rejected her multi-year campaign to force Social Security Administration (SSA) approval of her 2013 request for Disability Insurance Benefits.

Coronado, who has operated a successful music studio, claimed she couldn’t sit or walk for long periods—or even drive without assistance—because she suffered a herniated disc in her spine as well as wrist, shoulder and hip injuries following a 2010 automobile accident that landed her in the hospital for numerous surgeries.

She also insisted she couldn’t grocery shop, stand in the shower, perform household chores, escort her dog around the neighborhood or work any job and needed public financial support: the ideal résumé for a politician, don’t you think?

In 2016, however, government officials determined she’d failed to prove she was “unable to engage in any substantial, gainful activity by reason of any medically determinable physical or mental impairment.”

Those officials acknowledged Coronado suffered “some” impairment but concluded she could work, if she wanted, jobs such as cashier, photo machine operator or office assistant—positions for which they say are plentiful.

In January 2018, the Cypress resident sued inside Orange County’s Ronald Reagan Federal Courthouse. But U.S. Department of Justice prosecutors weighed in, voicing skepticism. They were startled that Coronado said her disability severely hampered campaigning for public office but yet chose to run.

“Plaintiff has not demonstrated objective findings proving that she had motor loss or sensory or reflex loss,” an assistant U.S. attorney stated before opining that Coronado’s claims “were not entirely credible.”

U.S. Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Chooljian conducted a yearlong review and advised Selna she found no medical or legal evidence to overturn the SSA ruling as erroneous.

Though Coronado, who earned a doctorate in musical arts from the University of Southern California, fought an intense campaign to label Quirk-Silva “scary,” she lost by nearly 20,000 votes in the general election that saw Democratic Party romps in long-held Republican seats.

The self-styled “pro-family” Coronado sought newspaper publicity a decade ago by deriding California’s Harvey Milk Day, which honors the ambushed and assassinated San Francisco supervisor’s historic push for gay civil rights protections, saying no public funds should benefit homosexual taxpayers.

CNN-featured investigative reporter R. Scott Moxley has won Journalist of the Year honors at the Los Angeles Press Club; been named Distinguished Journalist of the Year by the LA Society of Professional Journalists; earned six dozen other reporting awards; obtained one of the last exclusive prison interviews with Charles Manson disciple Susan Atkins; featured in Jeffrey Toobin’s The Best American Crime Reporting; and hailed by two New York Times Magazine writers for his “herculean job” exposing entrenched Southern California law enforcement corruption.

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