Child Porn Distribution Lands Orange County Man in Federal Prison

An Anaheim man indicted in 2016 on child pornography charges stemming from then-five-year-old Internet activity entered federal prison this month to serve a 70-month sentence.

Daniel Robert Branton had faced a maximum incarceration term of 20 years for possessing more than 600 child porn images and allowing other individuals to access the material through a peer-to-peer file-sharing network, Gigatribe.

According to federal prosecutors, the 39-year-old man’s cache included pictures of prepubescent minors performing sexually explicit acts as well as involved in sadistic and masochistic conduct.

Branton, who has ties to Colorado, conceded guilt in a Dec. 2017 plea agreement.

Inside Orange County’s Ronald Reagan Federal Courthouse, U.S. District Court Judge Andrew J. Guilford ordered the defendant to register as a sex offender, submit to a mental evaluation, undergo supervised probation for the rest of his life, stay at least 100 feet from places where children congregate, avoid working any place that would give him regular contact with kids and use only government-approved electronics.

He also is permanently banned from all communications with a person under 18 years old unless in the presence of the child’s parent or legal guardian.

Federal prison authorities report Branton is presently housed at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles.

He is scheduled for release three days before Thanksgiving in 2023.

R. Scott Moxley’s award-winning investigative journalism has touched nerves for two decades. An angry congressman threatened to break Moxley’s knee caps. A dirty sheriff promised his critical reporting was irrelevant and then landed in prison. The U.S. House of Representatives debated his work. Federal prosecutors credited his stories for the arrest of a doctor who sold fake medicine to dying patients. Moxley has won Journalist of the Year honors at the Los Angeles Press Club; been named Distinguished Journalist of the Year by the LA Society of Professional Journalists; and hailed by two New York Times Magazine writers for his “herculean job” exposing Southern California law enforcement corruption.

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