Dana Rohrabacher Deposited More Campaign Contributions Into His Personal Bank Account Than He Raised In Pre-Election Report


We've told you several times over the years about how cheapskate Orange County Congressman Dana Rohrabacher routinely deposits chunks of campaign contributions directly into his own bank account by claiming his wife, Rhonda, earned the money.

Wink, wink.

Rohrabacher, the alleged anti-federal government spending blabbermouth who has been sucking–no, slurping–on the federal teat for more than 30 consecutive years, doubled down on his shameless hypocrisy in his latest mandatory campaign disclosure report.
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Orange County's senior career politician reported in his just filed pre-election report with the Federal Election Commission
that he received $3,410 during the first 16 days of October and paid
himself–err, sorry, Rhonda–$4,433 during the same period.

Hmmm.

Carry the three, add the six….


According to my math, Rohrabacher's campaign fund really should be renamed: The Dana Rohrabacher Personal Expense Gift Fund That Barely Skirts Federal Law on Technicalities Account.

Can there be any doubt that Rohrabacher's campaign fundraising operation is little more than a devious way to enhance his own private wealth?




Rohrabacher,
a Costa Mesa resident who is a chest-thumping warhawk nowadays but carefully avoided all military service–especially any combat duty–during the Vietnam War, first ran for Congress in 1988 on the platform
that he would serve no more than six years in Washington, D.C. as a way
to prevent his corruption.

I'm money-hungry sly, ain't I?

On
Nov. 6, he will take the office–and all the lucrative pay and
perks–for his 25th and 26th years on the term limits platform.

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R. Scott Moxley’s award-winning investigative journalism has touched nerves for two decades. An angry congressman threatened to break Moxley’s knee caps. A dirty sheriff promised his critical reporting was irrelevant and then landed in prison. The U.S. House of Representatives debated his work. Federal prosecutors credited his stories for the arrest of a doctor who sold fake medicine to dying patients. Moxley has won Journalist of the Year honors at the Los Angeles Press Club; been named Distinguished Journalist of the Year by the LA Society of Professional Journalists; and hailed by two New York Times Magazine writers for his “herculean job” exposing Southern California law enforcement corruption.

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