OC's Ebrahim Baytieh Named California's Outstanding Prosecutor of the Year


The California District Attorneys Association (CDAA) has named Orange County's Ebrahim Baytieh as the state's “Outstanding Prosecutor of the Year.”

The honor is not surprising.

During his career, Baytieh–a tireless Senior Deputy District Attorney with a photographic memory and a gentlemanly courtroom demeanor–has put a whopping 43 killers in prison, including five who now sit on San Quentin State Prison's notorious Death Row.
]

“This award is a tremendous acknowledgement of the hard work and
dedication that Ebrahim puts into every case,” District Attorney Tony Rackauckas
said in a prepared press statement. “He is passionate about protecting
the rights of victims and tireless in his fight for justice . . . [The
honor] is well deserved.”

Last year, Baytieh–who has prosecuted every type of homicide and is largely responsible for sending an entire generation of Little Saigon gangsters and white supremacist hoodlums with Public Enemy Number One Death Squad to prison–won convictions against nine Orange County Jail inmates who savagely murdered a fellow inmate, John Derek Chamberlain, in 2006.

If you're interested in Baytieh's superb courtroom prowess, go HERE to read one of my previous articles, “White Power with a Lisp.”

He is scheduled to receive the award at the organization's June conference in Napa.

Follow OC Weekly on Twitter @ocweekly or on Facebook!

R. Scott Moxley’s award-winning investigative journalism has touched nerves for two decades. An angry congressman threatened to break Moxley’s knee caps. A dirty sheriff promised his critical reporting was irrelevant and then landed in prison. The U.S. House of Representatives debated his work. Federal prosecutors credited his stories for the arrest of a doctor who sold fake medicine to dying patients. Moxley has won Journalist of the Year honors at the Los Angeles Press Club; been named Distinguished Journalist of the Year by the LA Society of Professional Journalists; and hailed by two New York Times Magazine writers for his “herculean job” exposing Southern California law enforcement corruption.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *