Ex-Orange County Politician Eddie Rose Still Battles “The PC Police”


Two decades ago, calling himself “proudly politically incorrect,” Eddie Rose, then a colorful conservative Laguna Niguel councilman with an independent streak, gained national attention for several days when he reacted publicly to a 1995 jury that found O.J. Simpson not guilty of the savage murders of the ex-football star’s wife Nicole and her friend Ron Goldman.

Rose opined that a majority black jury had let a “brother go free” after buying Simpson defense attorney Johnny Cochran’s “slick, jive-talkin’ rhetoric.”

Angry protesters attacked his statements as racist, but he claimed he had simply addressed a broken criminal justice system that favors the wealthy over everybody else.

Race forward to Oct. 28, when Ross, whose campaign motto was “A voice, not an echo,” demonstrated in a group email that he’s still battling what he sees as the “PC police.” During the 2017 World Series, Houston Astro Yuli Garriel used his fingers to pull the skin away from his eyes in a gesture to Los Angeles Dodger pitcher Yu Darvish, who is of Japanese and Iranian descent.

Like the Angry Asian Man blog, which monitors racial slurs in popular culture, and the mainstream media, Major League Baseball (MLB) officials viewed Garriel’s actions as a blatant anti-Asian insult, which earned a fine and a five-game suspension next season.

Rose fumed.

“The politically correct police are at it again,” he concluded, calling the Astro’s conduct “an innocuous and ambiguous” gesture. “These days you can’t even do, say or imply anything anymore without offending the PC police.”

He’s also upset at the media for what he sees as the glorification of “semi-literate” and “anti-American” National Football League (NFL) players “with their seven-figure salaries and single-digit IQs who, were it not for their prowess in running a football or dunking a basketball, would probably be out on some street corner pimping or dealing drugs.”

Rose couldn’t be reach to describe any reactions he might have received about his comments.

R. Scott Moxley’s award-winning investigative journalism has touched nerves for two decades. An angry congressman threatened to break Moxley’s knee caps. A dirty sheriff promised his critical reporting was irrelevant and then landed in prison. The U.S. House of Representatives debated his work. Federal prosecutors credited his stories for the arrest of a doctor who sold fake medicine to dying patients. Moxley has won Journalist of the Year honors at the Los Angeles Press Club; been named Distinguished Journalist of the Year by the LA Society of Professional Journalists; and hailed by two New York Times Magazine writers for his “herculean job” exposing Southern California law enforcement corruption.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *