Stem Cell Transplant Dr. Eugen Michael Molnar has CA Medical License Revoked

E. Michael Molnar promoting his live cell therapy (left) and answering questions about his work in Jakarta, Indonesia, in 2008. Both from YouTube

The Medical Board of California recently revoked the license to practice of a Czechoslovakia-born physician who began his career in plastic surgery but went on to transplant fetal precursor cells in patients of his offices in Orange County and around the world.

Click here to read the order against the license of Dr. Eugen Michael Molnar that went into effect on March 29.

Discipline against the California license issued to Molnar on March 23, 1972, actually extends back to the treatment of patients as far back as 1982, according to the archived records of the medical board, whose last known address for the doctor was in Santa Ana.

An accusation filed by then-state Attorney General John Van de Kamp and Deputy AG Alan S. Meth alleged that Molnar performed nasal surgeries in April and December of 1982 that were not covered by two females’ health insurance companies, which were nonetheless billed for covered procedures that were not actually done. One of those patients was a Molnar employee whose statement to her insurance company falsely claimed she had fallen in the bathroom getting ready for work and broke her nose.

The state alleged similar schemes the following year with a man who received a nose job and forehead lift and a woman who got face and forehead lifts. Neither set of cosmetic surgeries were covered by those patients’ insurance companies, which were falsely billed for covered procedures not actually performed, claimed the board.

Van de Kamp and Meth also took issue with an August 1984 Orange County Register advertisement that stated Molnar was among the Institute of Beauty Surgery Medical Group doctors who was a Board Certified Cosmetic Surgeon, even though he had not achieved such certification from the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

The Attorney General’s office filed a supplemental accusation in 1985 against Molnar’s license. It alleged a female patient who went to get upper and lower eyelid surgery in March 1982 also received a forehead lift she did not request. When she complained, Molnar allegedly told her to call back in six months, at which time he could do additional surgery if needed. She called back but, according to the board, could not get an appointment with Molnar.

The accusation also claimed that Molnar worked on the breasts of a woman who later went to work for him. A year later, she suffered complications that Molnar allegedly said he’d operate on for free. Her insurance was later billed for all kinds of work not actually performed, and some submitted forms had the patient’s forged signature, according to the accusation.

Another woman who worked for Molnar got “free” upper “oriental” eyelid surgery and a chin augmentation, but her insurance was billed for the removal of facial tumors, states accusation, which further alleges the doctor “aided and abetted” three employees “in the unlicensed practice of nursing.” 

A second supplemental accusation filed in 1987 concerns a Molnar nurse who in March 1982 received a boob job and upper eyelid surgery, but her insurance was billed for a breast biopsy and nasal surgery. A third supplemental accusation filed in November 1989 concerns a woman who went to Molnar to have breast implants removed in 1985 due to complications. The doctor allegedly ruptured one implant during surgery, failed to remove the second and then falsely told the patient both had been taken out. His operative report and submission to the woman’s insurance carrier also falsely claimed both implants were removed, according to the accusation, which also faulted Molnar for trying to renew his license in Nevada “by fraud and misrepresentation.”

Molnar and his attorney at the time, Randall J. Hite, signed a document on July 28, 1989, that states they concurred with the state’s case against the medical license and understood further practice would be subject to terms and conditions. On Dec. 29, 1989, Molnar’s license was placed on five years probation with the stipulation that certain conditions be met.

However, two years later, Molnar and Hite sought to terminate the probation order. The board then found that Molnar “failed to demonstrate any present contrition” from “serious and severe conduct,” and the petition was denied. 

But Molnar’s globe-trotting career was on a dual track by then. According to his bio, he had been educated by the Komensky University Faculty of Medicine in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, and certified by the Czechoslovak Board of Head and Neck Surgery. The invasion of Warsaw Pact armies into Czechoslovakia in 1968 forced him to emigrate to the United States, where authorities made him repeat his residency; he did so in Chicago from 1971-’75.

Molnar later moved to Los Angeles, where he was in private practice for head, neck, plastic and reconstructive surgery. His father’s death from complications from diabetes in 1976 plunged Molnar into the study of incurable and non-treatable diseases. His byline is on the first book written by a physician for the public on aging disease, according to Molnar’s bio.

But that bio also claims the U.S. medical industry launched “severe attacks” on such activities, so he switched to researching fetal precursor cell transplantation, which is also know as live cell therapy, in 1988. He began researching in Yugoslavia that same year, but the civil war stopped that work two years later, according to his bio.

He moved on to perform his live cell therapy research in Moscow in June 1990, and his bio adds that he has directly or indirectly treated 15,000 patients with various cell transplant techniques in Russia as well as the U.S., Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Mexico, Malaysia, Qatar, South Africa, Nigeria, Panama, Austria, Australia, India, China, Hong Kong, Macau and his home country, Czechoslovakia. He has also written textbooks and is hailed as the “father of cell transplantation” in Russia, according to his bio.

However, in state documents from this past September and March, California’s current Attorney General Xavier Becerra, Supervising Deputy AG Judith T. Alvarado and Deputy AG Richard D. Marino claim that Molnar did not live up to the conditions of his original license probation that were imposed nearly 30 years ago.

These include failing to submit quarterly progress reports to the board, have his practice monitored by the board and notify the board of his departures from and returns to the state. Molnar is also dinged for not notifying the board that he no longer lives at the Santa Ana address it has on file for him. (When a board investigator went there, the person who answered the door did not know of Molnar’s whereabouts.)

Because of all this, the board revoked Molnar’s license to practice in California.

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