4/20 DUI Checkpoints Tonight in SJC and Anaheim (and Santa Ana Saturday Night)

Now who’s going to wash the minivan? Image courtesy of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD)

Yes, it must be 4/20 somewhere today, but there also must be DUI checkpoints, as drivers will learn tonight in Anaheim and San Juan Capistrano.

Meanwhile, there is another in Santa Ana Saturday night.

Leading off is the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, whose DUI Enforcement Team holds its checkpoint in an unspecified area of San Juan Capistrano tonight from 7 through 3 a.m. Saturday.

The Anaheim Police Department Traffic Unit has announced the location of its operation, which will be in the area of Euclid Street south of La Palma Avenue tonight from 8 through 3 a.m. 

Meanwhile, the sheriff’s department also conducts a Motorcycle Safety Enforcement Operation today in Laguna Niguel, where specially assigned deputies will be patrolling in search of infractions by riders as well as drivers of four-wheeled vehicles that can make motorcycling unsafe.

The weekend DUI checkpointing picks up again Saturday, when the Santa Ana Police Department holds one from 9 p.m. through 2 a.m. in the area of 3500 W. 5th St.

We’ve written here before about the world of shit that can come to people popped for DUI (fines, jail time, lost work, attorney fees, etc., etc.), but did you know some arrestees out there make it even harder on themselves?

From 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 12, Buena Park police officers took their positions near the North Justice Center in Fullerton. They watched eight people whose licenses had been suspended or revoked by a judge due to DUI walk back to vehicles for rides home.

“While some offenders complied with the law and had alternate means of transportation,” says Sgt. Nghia Nguyen, the BPPD Traffic Bureau supervisor, “four individuals in court for DUI proceeded to get behind the wheel and drove away from the courthouse.”

They did not get far, being immediately pulled over by cops and receiving another citation and trip back to court. It turned out three of the offenders had had their licenses suspended or revoked, and the fourth had never been licensed.

Nguyen says five vehicles were towed and impounded through the court sting. Seeing as how their were four offenders, I’m not sure how that works, but I never was good at math. How fast were they going, did they cross the North Pole and was the glass half empty or half tequila?

I do know that each police agency receives separate grant funding for anti-DUI operations from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

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