Political Operative Who Drained $100,000 a Month From OC Park Project Dies

Poof: Up, up and away went valuable public funds during the disgraceful Larry Agran and Arnold Forde era

Arnold Forde, one of Orange County’s sleaziest political operatives who helped drain massive public funds intended for the proposed Great Park project in Irvine, died at 82 years old on Saturday, according to the Voice of OC.

For many of his final years, Forde lived well off a $100,000 a month, no benchmarks public relations deal handed to him without competitive bidding by career politicians Larry Agran, Sukhee Kang and Beth Krom.

Forde received the windfall to supposedly perform public relations for the Great Park while it was non-existent.

Under Agran and Forde’s mismanagement, the Great Park project, arguably one of California’s most corrupt public operations, made political insiders rich while handing residents empty promises for more than a decade.

District Attorney Tony Rackauckas, another jewel of corruption, refused to investigate the financial shenanigans that handed Forde, Agran’s personal political consultant, at least $7.23 million.

Rackauckas and Forde became buddies in the early 1980s.

The ethically-flimsy DA, who claims to be ultra-conservative, aided Agran, an unabashed liberal, in his campaigns by inaction as well as performing supportive election robo-calls.

In 2014, a shameless New York Times writer celebrated Forde’s wealth without mentioning how he looted the Great Park project, a move that earned a necessary Weekly correction.

R. Scott Moxley’s award-winning investigative journalism has touched nerves for two decades. An angry congressman threatened to break Moxley’s knee caps. A dirty sheriff promised his critical reporting was irrelevant and then landed in prison. The U.S. House of Representatives debated his work. Federal prosecutors credited his stories for the arrest of a doctor who sold fake medicine to dying patients. Moxley has won Journalist of the Year honors at the Los Angeles Press Club; been named Distinguished Journalist of the Year by the LA Society of Professional Journalists; and hailed by two New York Times Magazine writers for his “herculean job” exposing Southern California law enforcement corruption.

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